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Tuesday, 8 March 2005

IPKAT TRANSLATION WATCH

L'affaire T-32/03, Leder & Schuh AG contre l'Office de l'harmonisation dans le marché intérieur (marques, dessins et modèles) (OHMI) has been posted on the OHIM website, in French and German. It's something to do with the JELLO SCHUHPARK trade mark. If anyone can tell the IPKat what this is all about, can he or she please post a comment below. Merpel says the IPKat should stop moaning and learn another 20 languages.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

The CFI upheld a successful opposition to an application for the mark “Jello Schuhpark” in classes 18 (various leather goods) and 25 (shoes and clothes), based on an earlier registration for the mark “Schuhpark” in Class 25 (clothes and boots). “Schuhpark” was held to be the dominant element, “Jello” being likely to be taken as a mere secondary mark/product line. Pretty standard stuff.

Strangely, both the parties, OHIM, and the BoA, were of the view that “Jello” would be understood by consumers to be faux-English for “yellow” - even though “Schufabrik” is clearly German [the German for “yellow” is “gelb”]. See, IP Kat, the rest of Europe can effortlessly swap between languages – time you started to learn!

Ilanah said...

If the rest of Europe could effortlessly swap between langauges then those involved in this case would know that Jello is American-English for jelly (yum) :-)

Anonymous said...

The plaintiff did mention that "jello" is English for jelly ("Wackelpudding" in German). But I suppose it would go too far, to expect the average German consumer to understand this translation - much easier to just understand it as it is pronounced. And the pronounciation of "jello" in German is exactly the same as "yellow". Looks like it is just one more of those fake Dinglish words used in German which many people actually believe are proper English words... - like "handy" (= "mobile") or "smoking" (= tuxedo)...

Ilanah said...

You win. Wackelpudding is a far better word than jelly or jello. I hereby challenge all IPKat readers to incorporate the word Wackelpudding into their conversation today. Prize for the best example.

Anonymous said...

Re WackelpuddingSays IPKat to Merpel: "My dear feline friend, do you like Wackelpudding?"

Replies Merpel to IPKat: "I'm afraid I don't know -- I have never actually wackelpudded".

Boom Boom!

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