For the half-year to 31 December 2014, the IPKat's regular team is supplemented by contributions from guest bloggers Rebecca Gulbul, Lucas Michels and Marie-Andrée Weiss.

Regular round-ups of the previous week's blogposts are kindly compiled by Alberto Bellan.

Sunday, 17 July 2005

SUNDAY BEST

1 From the Sunday papers

The IPKat found these little items in today's Telegraph:

* Nikolai Borg, an 86 year old designer, claims that German-based car maker Volkswagen took as its VW logo a design which was one of three commissioned from him in 1939. Representatives of the company say there is no evidence that it ever received his designs. The issue will shortly be resolved through litigation in Austria. Borg maintains that he is not interested in the money, but only in being acknowledged as the logo's designer.


* The AUSTIN motor car brand may yet be resurrected if Nanjing Auto, a Chinese manufacturer, is successful in its bid for the MG Rover plant in Longbridge. Nanjing, who has put in a £50 million bid for the failed plant, has enlisted the services of engineering design group Arup in producing a striking new vehicle which it hopes to make there.

* The VIRGIN brand, so successful for many products and services, has failed to catch the public's imagination in the field of ladies' underwear. Virginwear called in Hodgsons, the administrators, who have had problems trying to dispose of more than £2 million worth of VIRGIN stock. Hodgsons' staff are reported to have been "up to their armpits" in unwanted knickers.


2 A matter of interpretation

Ananova reports that Newcastle artist Sally Madge has gone into partnership with her pet gerbil. The rodent, which is gnawing its way through a copy of the 1933 edition of the New Illustrated Universal Reference Book, is being exhibited in "A Gerbil's Guide to the Galaxy" at Newcastle's Waygood Gallery. The display consists of remnants of the 72-year old book, an empty cage containing a nest of book fragments and a video webcast of the gerbil in action. Sally refers to the gerbil's "personal translation" of the book by choosing particular words and phrases. When the book is completely transformed, the shredded paper will be turned into a new piece of artwork.

The IPKat wonders, as usual, how much of this concept is protectable by copyright and what might be the parameters of infringement.

No comments:

Subscribe to the IPKat's posts by email here

Just pop your email address into the box and click 'Subscribe':