From October 2016 to March 2017 the team is joined by Guest Kats Rosie Burbidge and Eibhlin Vardy, and by InternKats Verónica Rodríguez Arguijo, Tian Lu and Hayleigh Bosher.

Saturday, 27 September 2014

Scientology controversy

I would like to thank Kat friend Chris Torrero for sending the link to this article. The Scientology community in New Zealand is being criticised for having used the term ANZAC for one of its fundraising campaigns to build a Scientology centre in Auckland. Every person donating $10,000 towards the project received the title ANZAC.  

The RSL and the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) are outraged at the use of ANZAC in such a context and have described it as abuse. In Australia and New Zealand, ANZAC refers to the Australian New Zealand Army Corps, specifically to the soldiers who helped in World War I. 

The DVA said that they had not received any application from the Scientology community to use the word, but that even if they had, such a request would never have been accepted. The DVA launched an investigation into Scientology and demanded that they end their campaign. The Scientology community was at risk of a $50,000 fine in Australia and New Zealand for using the ANZAC mark without permission. 

Australia has passed laws to protect the word ANZAC. Protection of Word ANZAC can be found in the Statutory Rules 1921 No.2, which was passed in accordance to the War Precautions Act Repeal Act 1920. Amongst other things, they limit the use of the word for use in trade or as a street name.

The Church of Scientology explained that the word was only used for internal purposes, not to do trade. They said that they did not mean to disrespect anyone and apologised for offending anyone. They have now withdrawn the campaign. 

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Since the religious group complied with the law, what is the controversy?

Anonymous said...

Although they say that the word was only used for internal purposes, it seems that the IPKAT picture is an example of a flyer that was circulated to the public, and that is it the public use of the word without permission that was against the law.

Anonymous said...

I am not saying what they starting doing did not violate the law.

Clearly it did.

I am saying that I just don't see the controversy since when it was brought to their attention, they stopped and complied with the law.

Now if they continued, then - then - there might be a controversy.

Did I miss something?

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