TRADE MARK TROUBLE FOR MCDONALDS IN SINGAPORE

The Straits Times reports that McDonald’s has lost a trade mark battle in Singapore. The US fast-food chain was claiming that Future Enterprises’ use of 'MacNoodles', 'MacTea' and 'MacChocolate' was infringing its MCDONALD’S trade mark. However, the Court of Appeals found that the names, used together with an Eagle device, were not deceptively similar to the McDonald's MAC or MC prefix. McDonald’s claimed that Future Enterprises’ use was designed to take advantage of McDonald's reputation but Future Enterprise’s lawyer explained:
'There can be no likelihood of confusion or deception. The marks are different in appearance, sound and concept…Our marks are visually and aurally different. Our colour scheme, font and typeface are different.'
The IPKat would be interested to know what Future Enterprises’ explanation is for the use of the MAC component of his mark. He notes that the company’s lawyer is using a test for similar of marks that is identical to that used in the EU.

Other famous macs here, here and here
TRADE MARK TROUBLE FOR MCDONALDS IN SINGAPORE TRADE MARK TROUBLE FOR MCDONALDS IN SINGAPORE Reviewed by Unknown on Tuesday, September 21, 2004 Rating: 5

1 comment:

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