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Monday, 18 January 2010

Letter from AmeriKat II: Bits 'n' Pieces

• Obama calls USPTO “Embarrassing” – Last Thursday President Obama told the Forum on Modernizing Government that "believe it or not, in our patent office -- now, this is embarrassing -- this is an institution responsible for protecting and promoting innovation -- our patent office receives more than 80 percent of patent applications electronically, then manually prints them out, scans them, and enters them into an outdated case management system…” and that this was one of the reasons why the average patent processing time “is roughly three years.” There is much more to the reason for this long processing time than that and Kappos is working on this problem, says the AmeriKat, but still … Ouch!


• Snap! Kodak sues Apple and RIM – Also last Thursday Kodak announced that it has filed a patent infringement law suit with the US International Trade Commission (ITC) against Apple and RIM claiming that the camera technology used in Apple’s iPhone and RIM’s BlackBerry to preview images infringes their digital imaging patent. The complaint asks that specific mobile phones with digital cameras be excluded from import unless RIM and Apple compensate Kodak. Kodak has also filed civil claims in the US District Court for the Western District of New York. For further information see this report in CNET and the BBC here.


• Apple fires back at Nokia - Last Friday Apple filed an ITC complaint against Nokia in the latest round of their ping-pong legal battle which seeks to ban the import of Nokia devices to the US. Last month Nokia filed a similar complaint with the ITC. As reported by Bloomberg, Nokia spokesperson Mark Durrant stated that
“Nokia will study the complaint when it is received and continue to defend itself vigorously. However this does not alter the fact that Apple has failed to agree appropriate terms for using Nokia technology and has been seeking a free ride on Nokia’s innovation since it shipped the first iPhone in 2007.”
See the AmeriKat’s previous posts on the battle here and here.

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